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Faqs

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

General

Depositing your work

Copyright FAQs

Preservation and Access FAQs

What is an Open Access repository?

An open access repository is one in which the full text of academic papers is freely available to anybody with an Internet connection and a web browser.

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What is Eureka! and how does it work?

Eureka! (url) is a digital repository for scholarly and cultural work created by staff at the ATEI of Thessaloniki. By offering a central location for depositing research or other scholarly work (including datasets, working papers, pre-publication scholarship, and published papers), Eureka! makes research available to a wider audience and helps assure its long-term preservation. Eureka! is based on DSpace, an open-source software created at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT):

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Do other universities have digital repositories?

Yes, examples in our city include the University of Macedonia, Institutional Repository system PSEPHEDA and the Aristotle University Institutional Repository system. There are several hundred such repositories worldwide and the list is growing. See OAISTER for a list of other repositories. Also see Dspace Instances for other repositories using Dspace.

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What is a Eureka! "Community?"

Communities are how Eureka! content is organized. A Eureka! Community is an administrative unit at ATEI that produces research or scholarship and can take on responsibility for setting community-level polices regarding use of ATEI Eureka!. Each community can contain one or more collections of content, or can contain sub-communities that have their own collections. Communities can also customize the Eureka! interface and submission process to meet their own particular needs. For a complete list of the current Eureka! communities and their collections, see (url)

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Why should I put my paper in Eureka!?

By placing your paper in Eureka! you can potentially reach a much wider audience and may increase the impact of your work. According to related researches papers available in open access repositories are cited more often than ones that are only available through subscription services. For more information on the effect of open access on citation impact see The Open Citation Project

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What kids of materials can I deposit in Eureka!?

Eureka! can handle a wide variety of content types and file formats, though different formats have different preservation implications. See our information pages on Depositing Your Work and File Formats for more details. Suggested materials for deposit include datasets, working papers, technical reports, audio and video files, and other supplementary research material that cannot generally be included in print journals, along with pre-prints and published papers, if the publisher grants permission. We have some general guidelines to help determine if a work is appropriate for Eureka!:
  • The work must be created or sponsored by ATEI affiliated faculty or staff, or by ATEI academic or research units.
  • The work should be of a scholarly nature.
  • The work should be completed and ready for distribution.


Each Eureka! Community may set its own policies regarding the specific content and submission processes for that Community.

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Who can add content to Eureka!?

ATEI faculty and staff, along with researchers associated with ATEI may deposit their scholarly work in Eureka!. A contributor must first be a member of a Eureka! community. Communities typically correspond to academic departments, research centres, or other organizational units and each community may make its own guidelines and policies for deposit of content. If you would like to join a community and are not sure who that community administrator is, or if you are not sure which community is most appropriate for you, please contact Eureka! staff at: (mail)

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Can I deposit material if I do not belong to a Eureka! Community?

If you do not see your department or research center listed, please contact us. We can help you establish a community.

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Who can search, browse, and download materials in Eureka!?

Eureka! is an open access repository, meaning anyone with access to the Internet and a web browser can search, view and download the content.

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How will people find my paper?

  1. By searching Eureka! directly from its own interface.
  2. Through conventional Internet search engines such as Google.  Because Eureka! is compliant with Open Access standards it is highly visible to such search engines and items in Eureka! will appear prominently in relevant results lists.
  3. Through specialist search services that harvest standards-compliant open access databases such as Eureka!.


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Can I restrict access to my work in Eureka!?

Yes, but we strongly prefer items in Eureka! to be open access. Items in Eureka! can be restricted to groups of registered users at the item, collection, or community level, with approval of the Community's administrator. Please contact us for further information: (mail)

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What can readers do with my work? What can I do with work done by others that I find in Eureka!?

Readers may search, view, link to, and download content from Eureka!. Unless otherwise stated on the work itself or on the download page for that work, the copyright holder for each work retains all rights associated with the works deposited in Eureka!.

Can students deposit work in Eureka!?

Students cannot deposit their work directly in Eureka!, but faculty may deposit student work if it is of a scholarly nature and the Community decides that it should be included. Keep in mind, however, that students own copyright to their works, and student work may be subject to additional policies. Eureka! staff can provide some assistance in obtaining the necessary written permission of students.

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What is the relationship between my personal web site and the papers in Eureka!?

You may wish to add a link to the full text of your article from your own or a departmental web page. If you already have links to full-text articles from your own web page, you may wish to upload the papers into Eureka! and then link to them there instead. Some of the advantages of doing this are:
  1. your paper may become more visible through Internet search engines such as Google: hits on Eureka! are likely to be placed higher up the list of search results than a link from your personal web page, thus making your research more visible to the outside world
  2. your paper can be retrieved through specialist search services
  3. the repository provides a robust system for the long term storage of your article and will continue to maintain your article should you move institution.
  4. the use of relatively short and persistent URLs within the repository makes referencing the online version of your paper easier and more reliable.


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Where can I get more help?

For further help on general questions please contact (mail).

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Depositing your work

What do I have to do to deposit my work?

First, you must join a Eureka! community or start a new one. See our General FAQs for more information. For assistance in joining or setting up a new community, please contact Eureka! staff at (mail). Then, you should follow the upload procedure steps. For further information on uploading see (dspace) help.

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I have a large number of previously published articles that I wish to contribute. Can you help?

Yes. In some cases, Information Services staff can provide such assistance. Please contact (mail)

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Is special software required to upload files?

No: the system uses standard web browsers; PC, Mac, and UNIX platforms are supported.

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Is there a limit on file size?

In theory, the system can handle any size file, but in practice there may be certain limitations affected by bandwidth and network limitations. If you are facing such problems contact us at (mail)

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Is there a total limit on the number of files I may deposit, or the overall size of a collection?

No. There is no limit on the number of items an individual or Community can submit to Eureka!, and there are no limits placed on the size of communities or collections.

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Can I delete a file after depositing it?

Because Eureka! is intended to provide for long-term, permanent access to scholarly work, we strongly discourage removal of content from the system, and individual users are not authorized to remove items directly. However, individual Communities may set policies regarding the conditions under which files will be authorized for deletion, and there may be other circumstances in which it is necessary to remove an item. In such cases, please contact Eureka! staff and we will take the appropriate action.

The permanent URL of any withdrawn item will contain a record with the item's metadata, and a note indicating that the item has been withdrawn from view (please note the item will normally still exist in our database but will not be made available for viewing, downloading or searching). The item's metadata will not be searchable, nor made available to search engines, but will be displayed when a citation elsewhere links directly to the item.

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Can I still link to my papers from my own web site?

Yes. You can still link to individual papers in Eureka! from your personal or department web site.

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Can I deposit multiple related files in a single item record?

Yes, a single item can contain multiple files so that all related material can be bundled together.

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Can I deposit the same item into multiple collections?

Items can exist in multiple collections, but your collection administrator or Eureka! staff must do this by “mapping” an item already existing in one collection into another collection. If there is an item you think belongs in more than one collection, please contact your collection administrator or Eureka! staff.

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What is metadata and why is it important?

Metadata is cataloguing information: title, author, citation information, subject keywords, etc. Eureka! creates a metadata record for every submission. These records are available to search engines, and are distributed to other libraries and research centres to add to their catalogues. Eureka! uses a metadata format called the Dublin Core. More information about the Dublin Core is available at http://dublincore.org.

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What descriptive information, or metadata, do I need to provide about the work when I deposit it?

At a minimum, each item deposited must have a title and date, but much more information can be included, and we encourage you to describe the work as completely as possible. A full list of available metadata fields is located at (link). Some reasons to provide a good description of your work are:
  1. To aid in the retrieval process.
  2. To act as a surrogate for the item (for instance, metadata harvesting for another system).
  3. For use in later products (for instance, a bibliography in a particular discipline).


If you indicate your work is previously published, you will be prompted to enter citation information as part of the submission process. You can use any citation format you wish, but be sure to include enough information that someone could locate the referenced version. For journal articles, include the journal title, volume and issue numbers, date, and paging. For book chapters, include authors' names, the book title, place of publication, publisher name, date, and pagination. Include a URL for items published on a Web site (such as a personal page or electronic journal). Each community or collection can have a customized submission process in which particular fields are required, or in which a standard metadata template is attached to each item. This can save time and ensure consistency when many items will be deposited that share much of the same metadata. If you would like to customize a community or collection's metadata template, please contact Eureka! at (mail).

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Can I just send my paper to Eureka! staff and have you upload it?

In some cases Eureka! staff can assist with requesting copyright permissions, scanning, and submissions. Contact us at: (mail).

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Where can I get more help?

For further help on “Depositing your work” questions please contact (mail)

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Copyright FAQs

Who owns the copyright of my paper?

Papers not yet submitted to a journal: as the author, you retain copyright unless you have made some other arrangement with a funder or sponsor.  The ATEI does not assert copyright in respect of research-related materials.

Papers that have already been published: in many cases you will have signed an agreement transferring copyright to the publisher. In this case you should ask for the publisher’s distribution permission. The moral rights of your work (ie. the intellectual property) belong to you for ever.

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What rights might I be signing away to publishers?

Each publisher has its own agreement, and so the rights that you have to give up will vary.  You may be forbidden to:
  1. Re-use a paper as a chapter in a book.
  2. Revise or adapt a paper.
  3. Distribute a paper to colleagues
  4. Reproduce copies of a paper for teaching purposes.
  5. Place a paper in an online open access repository.


If a publisher does not permit you to retain these rights then as an author you may not do any of these things automatically. However, you may be able to seek permission to do them from the publisher.

When you deposit a paper in Eureka! you confirm that you do have permission to do so. For details on what requirements need to be met to deposit a paper into Eureka! see the Eureka! deposit license (link)>.

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How do I find out whether I am allowed to place my paper in Eureka!?

Check whether you have a copy of the agreement you signed. This may indicate whether or not you are permitted to make your paper available in a repository (although some agreements do not explicitly cover this issue.)  If the agreement appears to forbid deposit in a repository, bear in mind that the publisher's policy may have changed since it was drawn up and that the change may be retrospective.

If you do not have a copy of the agreement, establish who the publisher of your paper is and contact him/her asking for a copy of your agreement.

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Why do I need to agree to the Eureka! Deposit License and what does it say?

The Deposit License is an agreement between you and the ATEI of Thessaloniki, allowing ATEI to make the work available through Eureka!, and to copy the item for preservation purposes. It s a LIMITED, NON-EXCLUSIVE agreement, meaning no copyright transfer occurs, and you retain all the rights you had before the item was deposited. The license also asks you to confirm that you do indeed own the copyright on the item, and have the right to deposit it in Eureka!. Please note that if you have published the work elsewhere, your publishing agreement may limit your ability to deposit items in repositories such as Eureka!.

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What rights do I grant the ATEI when I deposit my work in Eureka!?

You grant to the Alexander Technological Educational Institution the non-exclusive right to:
  1. Reproduce and/or distribute your submission (including the metadata and abstract) worldwide, in any format or medium for non-commercial, academic purposes only.
  2. Migrate the submission, without changing the content, to any medium or format, and keep more than one copy of your work for purposes of security, back up and preservation.


See the full text of the Deposit License (link) for more information.

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May I deposit copies of published articles in Eureka!?

Yes, but your agreement with the publisher must allow you to do so, or you must obtain permission from the publisher.

Will publishers be willing to accept my article if a pre-publication version is already in Eureka!?

Publishers have their own policies with regard to this. Many publishers recognized that pre-publication web posting is becoming a common practice, and more and more publishers are allowing posting of previously published articles, but publisher policies vary widely and they are not always easily available.

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Must I sign copyright agreements as they stand, or can I make changes?

If you are keen to avoid signing your rights away as an author you may wish to consider the following suggested options:
  1. Choose journals with a non-exclusive licence (those which do not require you to transfer copyright to the publisher)
  2. Choose journals with self-archiving-friendly copyright transfer agreements (those which permit the deposit of your article in a repository)
  3. Negotiate with your publisher
  4. Amend the existing agreement.
  5. Use an alternative agreement


A number of publishers are now starting to offer "licence to publish" agreements as an alternative to "copyright transfer" agreements, and often these are more liberal and may permit authors to deposit their papers in institutional repositories.

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If a publisher has changed its policy since my paper was published, does the new policy apply retrospectively?

Some publishers have changed their policies and extended the new rights to all authors regardless of when their papers were published. If it is unclear whether new rights are to be applied retrospectively it may be necessary to contact the publisher to check if this is the case.

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What do the following terms mean? (pre – print, post – print, personal or departmental web sites, publisher PDF)

It may not be immediately obvious from a copyright agreement, or from information on a publisher's web site, whether authors are permitted to place their papers in repositories or not. These are some terms to look out for:
  1. Pre-prints: this is usually defined as the author's final draft of a paper before peer-review.  Many publishers allow authors to place the pre-print in a repository.
  2. Post-print: this is the version of the paper as published, following peer review.  As author, you will probably have your own version of this final draft in the composition and editing format which you normally use (such as Microsoft Word.)  Some publishers allow authors to place the post-print in a repository, but some do not.
  3. Publisher PDF: whilst allowing authors to place a post-print in a repository, some publishers do not permit the use of the formatted PDF file that appears in the journal. If this is the case, you are only allowed to deposit an earlier version of the paper. However, some publishers actually prefer the final PDF version to be used, as this is a clear indication that an article in a repository is the final version and may also promote their role in its publication.
  4. Personal or departmental web sites: some publishers will only allow authors to make their articles available on a personal web site or on a departmental site. By permitting this, they are making a clear distinction between this type of web page and institutional repositories. The fact that the full text of the article can easily by found using search engines, regardless of whether it is available in Eureka! or on a personal web site within the teithe.gr domain, is immaterial.


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Where can I get more help?

For further help on “Copyright” questions please contact (mail)

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Preservation and Access FAQs

How does Eureka! preserve my work? How long will the files in Eureka! last?

The ATEI uses standard data management practices to protect items stored in Eureka!. The database is backed up regularly and is kept secure against deletion or unauthorized modification.

The ATEI of Thessaloniki assures continuing access to items deposited in Eureka!. Every item deposited will remain retrievable from the repository. However, computer files depend on the availability of the appropriate software to render the functions and appearance intended by the file's creator; over time older software applications may no longer function on new computer platforms, leaving the files created with those applications inoperable. The level of access that the ATEI can assure to items stored in Eureka! may therefore range from preservation of the full functionality and appearance of the original file to preservation of the mere bit stream with no assurance that the file's original functionality or appearance can be recreated.

In general, files created with open or non-proprietary software offer the greatest likelihood that their functionality and appearance can continued to be rendered as computer environments change. Faculty and other creators of digital content are urged to carefully consider the implications of choosing one or another file format or software application, and to balance the importance of the functions provided by a software application against the importance of being able to preserve those functions over a period of years or decades. The ATEI identifies three levels of assurance for the continuing operability of digital files in Eureka!:
  1. Supported: There is a high likelihood that its content, appearance, and functions will be preserved over time. Supported file formats are well documented within the software community and can be rendered by a variety of software applications.
  2. Known: ATEI recognizes this format but cannot guarantee its support over time. In general, these are proprietary formats whose underlying code is not available to the wider software community. However, the greater the prevalence or popularity of a "known" format the greater the likelihood that the community of users will develop ways to keep operable older files created in that format.
  3. a.Unsupported: ATEI does not recognize this format. Based on current knowledge, there is limited likelihood that the appearance or functionality of unsupported files can be preserved.


For a current list of Supported, Known, and Unsupported file formats please see our File Formats (link) information page.

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What are the most recommended file formats?

We classify a format as "supported" if there is a high likelihood that its content, appearance, and functions will be preserved over time. Supported file formats are well documented within the software community and can be rendered by a variety of software applications. Some "supported" formats for Eureka! are:
  1. Adobe PDF
  2. XML
  3. Text
  4. HTML
  5. JPEG
  6. GIF
  7. PNG
  8. TIFF
  9. RTF
  10. Postscript
  11. MARC – TBD
  12. AIFF – TBD


Please see our File Formats (link) information page for full details.

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How can others find my material once it is in Eureka!?

When an item is deposited into Eureka! the metadata, or catalogue information, that you enter when you deposit that item is made available to other databases and search engines, such as Google Scholar (link) and OAIster (link). Users of those services will be able to find your material in Eureka!. Users can also search the Eureka! collection directly, through our web interface. Also, because each item has a persistent link, you can email or place links directly to your material on personal and departmental home pages, blogs and other web sites.

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What are persistent identifiers?

A persistent identifier is a unique location on the internet that will not change over time the way regular URLs do. They will be enduring citations. Every item deposited into Eureka! gets its own persistent identifier, or handle. (add example???)

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Can papers be removed from Eureka!?

In normal circumstances, Eureka! will retain and make publicly available all items that have undergone the submission process and been accepted into the repository. It is only in exceptional circumstances that items can be withdrawn. There may be times when it is necessary to remove items from public view. To preserve the historical record, all such decisions will be noted in the provenance field of the bibliographic record. The note will take one of the following forms:
  1. “removed from view at request of the author”
  2. “removed from view at the discretion of the ATEI of Thessaloniki”
  3. “removed from view by legal order”
Since any Eureka! item that has existed at some time may have been cited, we will supply a “tombstone” when the item is requested, which will include the original metadata (for verification) plus one of the above withdrawal statements in place of the link to the object. The metadata will be visible, but not searchable. These items will also be made unavailable for metadata harvesting.

Although items may be withdrawn from Eureka! for any of the above reasons, a request for withdrawal may also be refused. The final decision on withdrawal rests with the ATEI. For the formal policy statement on the withdrawal of items from Eureka!, please see the “Preservation policy”. (link)

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Where can I get more help?

For further help on “Preservation and Access” questions please contact (mail)

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